• Schoelkopf Gallery is pleased to debut its biannual exhibit and accompanying publication Now ModernThe publication and exhibition is an extension of the gallery’s mission and seeks to expand the canon of American Art through scholarship and storytelling exploring great American Modernists including those whose renown never matched their talent. Telling the vivid, human and unexpected stories of the American Modernists, Now Modern synthesizes the material, the creators, the market and the cultural and historic context which combine to give a work enduring value and meaning.

     

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  • Alice Trumbull Mason, Untitled, c. 1940

    Alice Trumbull Mason

    Untitled, c. 1940 Oil on Masonite
    22 x 28 inches
    55.9 x 71.1 cm
    • Dwinell Grant Black Circle, 1939
      Dwinell Grant
      Black Circle, 1939
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    • John Ferren #2 Composition on Red, 1936
      John Ferren
      #2 Composition on Red, 1936
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    • Hugo Robus The Winch, c. 1915-1917
      Hugo Robus
      The Winch, c. 1915-1917
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    • John Storrs Room Thirteen, 1931
      John Storrs
      Room Thirteen, 1931
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  • Andrew Wyeth, Ring Road, 1985

    Andrew Wyeth

    Ring Road, 1985

    “Most people were shocked by this picture. Several people said they’d buy it if I’d take out the road sign. That’s the whole reason! That brilliant yellow! Take it out?.. Hell no. They told me, ‘Your work is elemental, and that sign ties it down to a certain period.’ For God’s sake, the curve of that arrow and the brilliant yellow against the snow was it for me. When I saw that lemon yellow, that got me going. There’s Kuerner’s Hill in the back off to the right, guided by the arrow, in a way. The foundations are from old Mother Archie’s. Well, those stones looked almost like Stonehenge. I wasn’t after just a landscape. I was searching for something deeper. There’s an edge in it. I mean, it would be difficult to drive that road safely in winter. In this one the shadows are very important. It’s all rounded, sensuous – the curve of the road, the sign, the melted areas of the snow, the hill – sensuous.” 

    - Andrew Wyeth 

  • E. Ambrose Webster, Greenwich Village in Geometry, 1929

    E. Ambrose Webster

    Greenwich Village in Geometry, 1929

    Greenwich Village in Geometry exemplifies Ambrose Webster’s large-scale masterworks of the 1920s. Interpreted by one critic as a metaphor of the artist’s view of the American scene, this complex and colorful composition brilliantly conveys Webster’s unique modern vision, in which the artist applies vibrant hues and a mathematical system of proportion to design a dynamic world of his own creation. 

  • George Tooker, Jukebox, 1953

    George Tooker

    Jukebox, 1953

    George Tooker purchased a brownstone in Brooklyn Heights in 1953, and Jukebox portrays the local dance hall setting where Italian and Hispanic immigrants socialized in the neighborhood. Described by art historian Thomas Garver in his 2002 monograph as “one of Tooker’s most successful pictures,” this intimately scaled scene portrays the surreal subject for which he is best-known. In contrast to the romanticized view of American culture evoked by the Regionalist painters of the time, Tooker focuses on underlying social issues at play. The individual’s sense of alienation can be seen in the vacant gaze of the women despite the swags of festive streamers and colorful glow of the jukebox. The seated figure’s face appears masklike, hovering above her body. They are at a dance but not dancing. Jukebox was originally owned by Lincoln Kirstein, Tooker’s most important patron and supporter.

    • Beauford Delaney Untitled, 1960
      Beauford Delaney
      Untitled, 1960
    • Manierre Dawson Blue Boy, 1912
      Manierre Dawson
      Blue Boy, 1912
    • Joseph Stella Tropical Flower, 1920s
      Joseph Stella
      Tropical Flower, 1920s
  • Bob Thompson

    [Bob] Thompson [was] very much a man of his moment and also ahead of his time. The colors are so immediate and recognizably his, so visceral. Look at that joyful palette: scarlet, indigo, yellow, purple, lime. It’s like his mind is exploding in rainbow hues. That’s one way he made his sources feel so . . . happening, so now. He presaged the brightness of pop art and, even more, the electricity of psychedelia.

    - Ariella Budick

  • Bob Thompson, Untitled, c. 1963

    Bob Thompson

    Untitled, c. 1963 Mixed media on paper
    2 1/2 x 23 inches
    6.3 x 58.4 cm
  • Divine Defiance

    A conversation with Ariella Budick and Justin Davidson

    Bob Thompson defied labels and bucked trends during his short but prolific career, creating over 1,000 paintings by the time of his death at age 29.

  • Romare Bearden & Norman Lewis

    • Romare Bearden Cattle of the Sun God, 1977
      Romare Bearden
      Cattle of the Sun God, 1977
    • Romare Bearden Guitar Executive, 1979
      Romare Bearden
      Guitar Executive, 1979
    • Romare Bearden Marriage of the Viper (From the Rituals of the Obeah Series), 1984
      Romare Bearden
      Marriage of the Viper (From the Rituals of the Obeah Series), 1984
    • Romare Bearden St. Martin Obeah (Sorcier de St. Martin, Manmbo St. Martin Yan), c. 1984
      Romare Bearden
      St. Martin Obeah (Sorcier de St. Martin, Manmbo St. Martin Yan), c. 1984
    • Norman Lewis Untitled, 1964
      Norman Lewis
      Untitled, 1964
    • Norman Lewis Untitled, 1978
      Norman Lewis
      Untitled, 1978
  • Charles E. Burchfield

    “An artist must paint not what he sees in nature, but what is there. To do so he must invent symbols, which, if properly used, make his work seem even more real than what is in front of him.”

    Charles E. Burchfield, statement in Contemporary American

    Painting and Sculpture, 1961

  • Charles E. Burchfield, Hemlock in November, 1947-66

    Charles E. Burchfield

    Hemlock in November, 1947-66

    "During the 1960s, Burchfield created the largest, most compelling paintings of his life, with an abundance of ideas stimulating his imagination. Competing seasons and their transitions occupy compositions simultaneously, foretelling the future. These were the culmination of his 1915 “all day sketches” that now flamboyantly contrast fluctuating elements of weather conditions, radiant sounds, shifting light levels, and animated plants and wildlife. They surge with transcendent, mystical knowledge. He wanted the viewer to see

    and hear and smell each scene and be transported to his unique way of understanding life and our

    relationship to nature."

    - Nancy Weekly

  • Being Burchfield

    Excerpts from Nancy Weekly on Charles Burchfield

    Charles Burchfield’s romantic and fantastic watercolors reflect profound respect for nature’s energy, beauty, and sounds.

  • Georgia O'Keeffe

    “I realize I must be different than when I came out . . . I feel terribly alive”

    — Georgia O'Keeffe, on Taos, New Mexico

    • Georgia O'Keeffe Flower and Vase, 1921
      Georgia O'Keeffe
      Flower and Vase, 1921
    • Georgia O'Keeffe Hill, Stream and Moon, 1916-1917
      Georgia O'Keeffe
      Hill, Stream and Moon, 1916-1917
  • Georgia O'Keeffe

    Excerpts from the essay by Carol Troyen

    How New Mexico's "wonderful emptiness" transformed the artist's life and career.

  • Burgoyne Diller, Third Theme, 1952

    Burgoyne Diller

    Third Theme, 1952

    “There is no past…there is no future…there is only now. Time is the past, present, and future…now…and time is understood. Space is realized…the image is clear.”

     -Burgoyne Diller

  • Edward Hopper

    Excerpts from the essay by Carol Troyen

    How the critical and financial success of the 1920s led Edward Hopper to Two Lights, Maine—the setting of

    Bill Latham’s House.

    • John Marin Maine, 1952
      John Marin
      Maine, 1952
    • Edward Hopper Poplars, 1925
      Edward Hopper
      Poplars, 1925
    • Andrew Wyeth Eight Bells, 1939
      Andrew Wyeth
      Eight Bells, 1939
  • Newell Convers Wyeth, Wash Day on the Maine Coast, 1934

    Newell Convers Wyeth

    Wash Day on the Maine Coast, 1934

    Wash Day on the Maine Coast is among N.C. Wyeth’s earliest major paintings of Maine, a beloved location for the entire Wyeth family of artists. Bright, peaceful, and categorically sublime, the work epitomizes a reverence for the tranquil landscape of Maine, and its unusual, perfectly square size suggests a particular significance, as in this format, the painting could not have conformed to the vertical shape of standard paper size, as the artist’s well-known book illustrations often did.

    • Jean Metzinger, La Roulette, 1926
      Jean Metzinger, La Roulette, 1926
    • Newell Convers Wyeth The Duel on the Beach, 1920
      Newell Convers Wyeth
      The Duel on the Beach, 1920
    • Alfred Maurer The Woman in White, c. 1900
      Alfred Maurer
      The Woman in White, c. 1900
    • Clarence Carter Triplet Creek Special, 1932
      Clarence Carter
      Triplet Creek Special, 1932
    • Clarence Carter Stairwell at the Cleveland School of Art, 1927
      Clarence Carter
      Stairwell at the Cleveland School of Art, 1927
    • Charles Goeller Tenement Hallway
      Charles Goeller
      Tenement Hallway
  • Christo

    The Gates (Project for Central Park, New York City), 2002

    “Of course my drawings have their own quality separate from the three-dimensional projects; they have the independent dimension of a work of art. I’ve drawn all my life, since I was a little boy. I love to draw and make

    collages . . . but the beauty, force, and energy of these works come from reality, from the purpose for which they are created. They have a fabulous intimacy, a fabulous story each of these little sketches or big drawing, something deeply related to the particular moment in which I drew them.”

    —Christo

    • Charles Green Shaw Mannequin, c. 1934-35
      Charles Green Shaw
      Mannequin, c. 1934-35
    • George L. K. Morris Down South, 1948
      George L. K. Morris
      Down South, 1948
    • George L. K. Morris Composition, 1949
      George L. K. Morris
      Composition, 1949
    • George L. K. Morris Bank in Depression, 1933
      George L. K. Morris
      Bank in Depression, 1933
    • George L. K. Morris Arrangement, 1937
      George L. K. Morris
      Arrangement, 1937
    • Ralston Crawford Power Shovel, 1938
      Ralston Crawford
      Power Shovel, 1938
  • If you would like to subscribe to the gallery's biannual magazine, Now Modern, or would enjoy learning more about the artists or works presented, please contact Alana Ricca at (212) 879-8815, or alana@schoelkopfgallery.com. We look forward to being in touch.